4- Trends Outline/Paper Edit/Throw's/Etc

Segment Producer: Stephen
Reporter: Val
Camera: Ryan
Editor: Gavin

Multicultural Trends Paper Edit/Tape Transcription

PAPER EDIT

AUDIO VISUALS
- sound bite - Tape 5 – 15:35 – 15:40 – busy streets, different cultures
- V/O – Canada’s multiculturalism has seen significant growth since the new millennium. According to Statscan, between 2001 and 2006, immigration to our home and native land totaled 1.2 million people. And immigrants made up over two thirds of population growth. It’s no wonder our different cultures are becoming so fused. We found a great example nestled in the Albion Mall. - Tape 5 – 06:12–06:18 – Canada flag blowing in the wind; 00:50–00:55 – group of asian kids walking; 03:26-03:40 people track past camera FAST MOTION; 01:46-01:52 – bank w/ English/Chinese lettering

- Tape 3 – 04:04-04:10 – Albion Theatre sign
- Val, “Can I get a ticket” Tape 3 – 05:22-05:45 – Val gets ticket
Tape 4 – 06:25-06:36 – Val gets ticket
Tape 3 – 05:45-05:53 – Val walks to concession stand

- V/O – The Albion Theatre is a small cinema within the mall specializing in bringing South Asian films to Canada. Tape 3 – 03:22-03:27, movie posters
Tape 3 – 03:40-03:50, movie posters

- Val, stand-up – Where else can you get popcorn and Somosa’s??? This is where Canadian culture meets Bollywood. Let’s check it out. Tape 3 – 06:16-06:26 – Val stand up
Tape 4 – 07:19-07:25 – Val stand up from different angle
Tape 3 – 08:00:08:15 – Val takes her seat
Tape 4 – 07:26-08:52 – different angles of Val taking her seat

- Music – Old Time Style Reel
- Clip – Albion Employee, “The Albion has been playing movies since 1994. We opened, and since then we have been playing foreign movies only.” Begin old time movie reel
Tape 3 – 00:03-00:11 – interview clip
B-ROLL
Tape 3 – 04:38-04:43, wide shot of theatre

Clip – Albion Employee, “The more people coming to Toronto from another country, the better is for us. The better it is for the business.” Tape 3 – 00:21-00:27
Transition in reel

Clip – Albion Employee, “We have two theatres” Tape 3 – 00:30-00:32, interview clip
Transition in reel

Clip – Albion Employee, “It seats over, just over 1600”
Tape 3 – 00:34-00:38, interview clip
Transition in reel

Clip – Albion Employee, “Other theatres, we have one in Woodside, which also plays Indian movies. Then we have on in Barrie Tape 3 – 01:09-01:15, interview clip
End old time movie reel

- Val, stand up – “MMM that was great, just finished my snack. You just saw how Indian culture is being showcased to Canadians. Now let’s see how Canada’s favorite pass time is being infused into Indian culture.” Tape 3 – 10:30-10:52, Val sitting in theatre seat with finished snacks

- V/O – Hockey Night in Canada has been a Canadian tradition since 1931. Starting out as a weekly radio broadcast, the programming has grown to offer at least a double header every Saturday and multiple languages. Parminder and Harnarayan call the games in Punjabi. Tape 1 – 13:58-14:20 – Flatscreens with HNIC Logo, various television with hockey footage, Tape 2 – 13:46-14:17 – OTS of HNIC starting on TV

- Clip – Harnarayan – “CBC started to broadcast in different languages, they actually started in Mandarin. And then last year during the Stanley Cup Playoffs, it was Detroit Red Wings versus Pittsburgh Penguins, marquee matchup”….WHITE FLASH…”Joel Darling, who is the producer here, he mentioned if you’re gonna try other languages you gotta try Punjabi”…WHITE FLASH…”And that’s how it began. We did six games in the finals and the response was so tremendous they renewed the contrast for the whole season this year.” - Tape 1 – 00:17-01:12- Harnarayan Interview clip
B-ROLL, Tape 1 – 15:00-16:00 – two shot of commentary by them, Tape 1 – 20:26-20:38 – close up, Harnarayan commentating, Tape 1 – 20:56-21:39 – commentators, turning on mics, checking stats, etc

- V/O – These two feel they are spreading multiculturalism by bridging two cultures. - game footage from CBC, still waiting on this, hoping to get it Wednesday/Thursday
- Clip – Harnarayan – “Nothing says Canada is multicultural more than having, like Parminder said, having our national game broadcast in different languages. Tape 1 – 06:16-06:30 – Harnarayan Interview clip
WHITE FLASH
- Clip – Parminder – “The common Canadian isn’t average while person, or average white male, or whatever it is. I am Canadian. And it’s my duty, as much as anyone else’s to stay patriotic to our natural fabric.” Tape 1 – 12:22-13:52 – Parminder Interview clip
- V/O – For these guys it’s all about making people feel welcome in their new country. - game footage of Canadian HNIC promoting Punjabi edition, two hosts wave from booth
- Clip – Harnarayan – “New immigrants to this country, they don’t really know what Hockey is all about and whatever, and this is something that has brought them up to speed about the rules of the game, they can follow it better, so you know, they feel more involved Tape 1 – 06:30-07:20 – Harnarayan Interview clip
B-ROLL Tape 1 – 21:20-21:39 – each commentator researches players stats

- Clip – Parminder – “By presenting hockey in their own language they would be more inclined to watch it and get to know it like we were mentioning earlier, getting to know the rules.” Tape 1 – 07:25-08:31 – Parminder Interview clip
B-ROLL
Tape 1 – 20:38-20:47 – Parminder ‘hand’ talking
- Clip – Parminder – “We prodiminately speak 90% Punjabi and then there is 10% worth of English that doesn’t translate over.” Tape 1 – 10:40-11:00 – Parminder Interview clip
- Clip – Harnarayan – “And just to add to that, field hockey is very popular in Punjab and that’s how a lot of the hockey terms switch over like goal and net and shoot and score.” Tape 1 – 11:17-11:35 – Harnarayan Interview clip
- Sound Bite, game commentary in Punjabi - game footage from CBC, still waiting on this, hoping to get it Wednesday/Thursday
- Val, stand up – “There you have it guys. We just saw how 2 Canadian pass times are getting a multicultural twist. With Canadian diversity still growing, the sky’s the limit for integrating different cultures. For the Vibe, I’m Valerie Lailett. Now let’s head back to the studio.
Tape 2 – 18:02-18:22 – Val, stand up
** Timed with the V/O, clips and stand-ups is about 3 minutes. With sound bites and b-roll we are right on track for 3:30.

SUGGESTED INTRO/EXTRO

INTRO:
Anchor 1 - Quick stat for you kids…Last year, over 102 million tickets were sold at movie theatres across Canada.
Anchor 2 – And 1.2 million viewers tune into Hockey night in Canada every Saturday…
Anchor 1 – Here is Vibe Engineer Valerie Lailett with a couple Canadian pass times with a multicultural spin.

EXTRO:
Anchor 1 - I had no idea there was so much programming in other languages.
*Witty Banter*
Anchor 2 - If there are any basketball fans out there, the guys are calling their first Toronto Raptors game this Sunday courtside from the Air Canada Centre.

TRANSCRIPTION

Tape 1 – Parminder/Harnarayan Singh Interview *INTERVIEW AUDIO*

00:00 – 00:13 – Hockey Night in Canada symbol on TV, 2 shot of interview. Ambient sound

00:13 – 00:17 - VAL, “How did Hockey Night in Canada Punjabi edition start?”

00:17 – 01:12 - HARNARAYAN close up, “Well, um, CBC started to broadcast in different languages, they actually started broadcasting in Mandarin. And then last year during the Stanley Cup Playoffs, it was Detroit Red Wings versus Pittsburgh Penguins, marquee matchup! And they decided to expand and they started thinking about what other languages, and Kelly Rhudy, who is actually a fairly prominent member of Hockey Night in Canada and former NHL Goalie. He said to CBC, Joel Darling, who is the producer here, he mentioned if you’re gonna try other languages you gotta try Punjabi. Cause everyone is playin’ ball hockey, nobody knows how to skate, and there is an interest in the community for sure. And that’s how it began. We did six games in the finals and the response was so tremendous they renewed the contract for the whole season this year.”

01:12 – 01:19 - VAL, “You said the program has really grown, can you tell us how?”

01:19 – 03:25 - PARMINDER close up, “I think the key indicators for us was to use some form of new media. And a person who became our friend later on was an individual who started a Facebook group for us. And, as you know, its very difficult to get ratings, or very expensive to get ratings off of these things that they actually put us online at CBC initially and there were no real plans to put us on television. And Shaw, which is a network cable provider out west, picked us up and put us on a digital channel. And, as you know, out west they are not as technologically developed as we are out here, so not a lot of them had digital boxes, so we were hearing stories where people were going out and purchasing digital boxes, so they could watch the Punjabi program. And then just with Facebook in itself, within a couple of day we had over 3000 members. And the key indications for CBC was it blew up online and a lot of people were watching this online, so when the season began Rogers picked it up, Bell picked it up, now we have our channels within these cable providers and I think that became a good indicator of how the fan following was becoming very receptive to it. And we recently celebrated Hockey Day In Canada, and we were allocated about 200 members, Maple Leaf Sports Entertainment approached us and said were doing an open practice between the Leafs and Canucks do you think the community would be interested and we jumped on board and said yes we think this would be a great idea. We really didn’t know what the outcome of that was going to be. So they initially gave us a number of 150 people or 100 people, can you put together 100 people and we said yes, sure, but we kept going back to them cause, you know, we said we need 50 more tickets, then 150, then 200, 250, then at on point we were requesting close to 300 tickets for people to attend. And in the end, we had over 260 kids, and parents, and staff, schools who came out to celebrate Hockey Day in Canada, these are all people from the Punjabi community. And that was a very good indicator, I guess, of the reception we are getting, from the community for this broadcast.”

03:25 - 03:33 - VAL, “Do you see the program expanding to other languages?

03:33 – 04:02 - HARNARAYAN close up, “I think, ya, CBC is trying different languages and I think its something definitely, in the States I mean, all us Canadians wonder what that SAP button is, it’s Spanish programming, so you can just switch from English to Spanish. It speaks to Canada’s diversity, it’s such a cultural Mosaic in this country, and it’s so diverse, it’s probably inevitable it’ll grow to other languages.

04:02 – 04:06 - VAL, “Do you see the program growing to other sports?”

04:06 – 06:05 - PARMINDER close up, “Ya, definitely, and I think it probably already has. The reason I say that is soccer. You can watch soccer in almost every different language. And, well, hockey, you can’t. And I think hockey, the NHL, has just kind of been behind the ball on this one. And even when the NBA, when Yao Ming came over, they started production in Cantonese and Mandarin. And we have so many players, especially in Toronto. Jose Calderon, Spanish. Or Italian, Bargnani, that other communities are looking at providing various languages. And I think with the Olympics around the corner, especially with Canada hosting them. Sometimes we wonder that having such a diverse country. And having people who are very skilled in various areas from all parts of the country, sorry all parts of the world, living in Canada, we should be the leaders of multiculturalism and just walking down the streets of Toronto, and other big metropolis’s, it’s very visible, the level of multicultural, I guess, integration amongst our regular common everyday lifestyle. I mean look at us, look at anyone else around you today and we can see the diverse community we live in. Why have we not taken this to our national sport. And, so when it comes to questions of you know, other sports coming on board, and I think that we, the NHL and hockey kind of missed the bus on it. Now it’s time for them to make a lot of ground on it. But where Canada can improve on this is when it comes to the Olympics, that by providing various languages the opportunity to watch what we feel are Canadian sports, you know, if it’s figure skating, or even curling, and so forth. A lot of other folks, or new immigrants, don’t appreciate these sports as much as we do cause of lack climate or anything that they weren’t raised by it. If we do want to continue striving making Hockey Canada’s national sport, and keeping it at that level, then we need to have these efforts in place in order to do so.

06:06 – 06:16 - VAL, “Obviously this program promotes multiculturalism, how do you feel it does this?”

06:16 – 07:20 - HARNARAYAN close up, “Sure, ya, I think, nothing says Canada is multicultural more than having, like Parminder said, having our national game broadcast in different languages. One thing Parminder and I also realize is this makes people feel more Canadian. You know, Parminder and I have talked about how we have received feedback from the community, where people who are new Canadaians , new immigrants to this country, they don’t really know what Hockey is all about and when they are at work a lot of their colleagues are talking about last nights game, or whatever, and this is something that has brought them up to speed about the rules of the game, they can follow it better, so you know, they feel more involved they feel more Canadian. Another thing we’ve also heard is that, it’s an opportunity for the second-generation immigrants, to learn the language, to keep a part of their heritage. So it’s almost bridging the cultures together, there’s Canadian culture that is hockey, and then you’re maintaining the Punjabi language. And you’re putting them both together, and that’s multiculturalism right there. And it’s great.”

07:20 – 08:31 - PARMINDER close up, “And when we speak about integration, I think one of the biggest issues here is some people, they commonly make the mistake, that by presenting other languages in a broadcast you are isolating people. And what a bigger isolation can you have if were not welcoming new people to our country? And I think that is a greater isolation than providing other language programming. When it comes to hockey, and I say this day in and day out, people stay up until 2 a.m. to watch cricket games because they are broadcast, but that’s a sport they can relate to cause they grew up with that sport. By presenting hockey in their own language they would be more inclined to watch it and to get to know it like we were mentioning earlier getting to know the rules. That’s what it comes down to, if you don’t know the rules of the game, I am very less likely to watch Rugby over football. I love football, I watch football, but I wouldn’t watch rugby. It’s presented in English; it’s just not my sports. But for a new immigrant, if we can present a sport in their language, they might feel something that is bringing them closer to us. And making Canadian Hockey, feel more like Punjabi hockey. And I think that’s the kind of key goal here.”

08:31 – 08:34 - VAL, “Did you both grow up watching or playing hockey?”

08:34 – 09:02 - HARNARAYAN two shot, “Most definitely, he is a die hard Leafs fan and I’m a die hard Oliers fan, although we can’t say that on the broadcast. But of course, growing up we were both hockey fans, we played a lot of bal hockey, and we played ice hockey at the shinny level, not really organized but ball hockey is actually something that is very popular in the Sikh community. And I think this is something that are going to make the newer kids, growing up, want to learn how to skate more, and probably, it won’t be long until we see Punjabi players in the NHL, who knows right?”

09:03 – 10:30- PARMINDER two shot, “And I think the common culture, when winter comes, and the father figure of the family goes out in the backyard and makes this ice rink. And you know, kids learn to skate, and we have images of being in that family setting learning how to skate, then they are put into minor hockey, and they enjoy that sport, and its tradition. And I think that in a few years down the road, if we can, you know, kind of, inform the parents at that level about skating and hockey. And we grew up playing ball hockey. And whether it was snowing or not, we had our shovels in the back of our cars, or just having the shovels on the back of our bikes, and shoveling the ground to play hockey, that’s how diehard fans we are. And that kind of Canadian culture, is you know, second to none other. And how can we make people feel more Canadian, is I think just broadcast such as this so people can enjoy hockey at all levels and get involved in hockey and have their kids involved in hockey. So I think we have a hidden agenda here, we are trying to make hockey the best sport in the world…

10:30 – 10:40 - VAL, “…Do you speak in both languages during the commentary?”

10:40 – 11:17 – PARMINDER close up, “Well predominately we speak 90% Punjabi and then there is 10% of words in Elngish that don’t translate over. So it’s been well for us, that also growing up Canadian, also having learned the language of Punjabi , that we are able to integrate this. And a lot of kids like watching this because we do switch back and forth and then they can sit with their parents and A they are learning English, the parents are learning English from this. And for those who cant speak Punjabi, it makes it easier for them as well.”

11:17 – 11:39 - HARNARAYAN close up, “And just to add to that, field hockey is very popular in Punjab and that’s how a lot of the hockey terms and switch over like goal and net and shoot and score, there are some key words, offside is another, that’s what it’s called in field hockey in Punjab too. So there are some English words that are in both sports.”

11:40 - 11:42 - VAL, “Is there anything else you guys would like to add?”

11:14 – 12:21 - HARNARAYAN close up, “I think, just speaking for both of us, this is a dream come true. And it’s something were loving to do.” TWO SHOT. “I think ourselves, and CBC, everybody, had no idea how big this was going to become. And having our broadcast all across Canada. And when we go into the grassroots communities, when we go to the community centers, Punjabi events that are happening and you see little kids come up and say hey you’re the guy and all that kind of stuff, it makes it feel like were giving back to the community and its been a fantastic experience and I hope it just keeps growing.

12:22 – 13:52 - PARMINDER close up, “And I think that for a Canadian society to the rich resourced of multiculturalism. You know we have always looked at multiculturalism and a negative thing. And at times it has taken place cause you look at ok there’s China town, or there’s Little Italy, or there’s Little India and so forth, and the integration process was sort of missing. And what we need are some common underlining’s, for people to have that common connection. And being in Canada and understanding the freedoms and the rights we have as a Canadian might not be available to them back home or the opportunities we have here. And how being almost second generation Canadians, we can look back and say hey, you know what, the common Canadian isn’t average white person, or average white male, or whatever it is. I am Canadian. And it’s my duty, as much as anyone elses, to stay patriotic to our natural fabric. That we can make Cnada the best it can be in a very inclusive manner. And the US likes to use the Melting Pot Scenario, where we all understand Globalization means using the best of what everyone can provide and bring to the table. So I think for anyone watching, for any Canadian watching, and listening, this is kind of key for what the future has in store. Its not about separation, its not about segregation, its about inclusivity and joining together to reach for the common goals and make this world a little bit more peaceful and friends for everyone to live in.

13:58 – 14:20 - TV screens, showing Hockey Night In Canada vis, control room shots

14:21 – 19:48 – two shot of 1st perioid commentary is Punjabi

19:48 – 20:26 – Parminder/Harnarayan: taking notes, researching, hand shots, etc

20:26 – 20:38 – Close up of faces, commentating

20:38 – 20:47 – Parminder ‘hand-talking’

20:47 – 20:56 – Close up, Harnarayan commentating

20:56 – 21:39 – Commentators turning mics on, pushing control buttons, both research on computers, putting headsets on, etc

21:40 – 22:12 – commentary of game, 2 shot, locked off

22:13 – 22:26 – OTS shot with TV and Val in background

22:27 – 22:35 – illuminated ‘On Air’ light

22:36 – 36:30 – locked off 2 shot, commentary

Tape 2 – Parminder/Harnarayan Singh Interview *NO INTERVIEW AUDIO*
• Locked off 2 shot for entire interview

00:00 – 00:06 - VAL, “How did Hockey Night in Canada Punjabi edition start?”

00:07 – 00:59 - HARNARAYAN, “Well, um, CBC started to broadcast in different languages, they actually started broadcasting in Mandarin. And then last year during the Stanley Cup Playoffs, it was Detroit Red Wings versus Pittsburgh Penguins, marquee matchup! And they decided to expand and they started thinking about what other languages, and Kelly Rhudy, who is actually a fairly prominent member of Hockey Night in Canada and former NHL Goalie. He said to CBC, Joel Darling, who is the producer here, he mentioned if you’re gonna try other languages you gotta try Punjabi. Cause everyone is playin’ ball hockey, nobody knows how to skate, and there is an interest in the community for sure. And that’s how it began. We did six games in the finals and the response was so tremendous they renewed the contract for the whole season this year.”

01:00 – 01:09 - VAL, “You said the program has really grown, can you tell us how?”

01:10 – 03:16 - PARMINDER, “I think the key indicators for us was to use some form of new media. And a person who became our friend later on was an individual who started a Facebook group for us. And, as you know, its very difficult to get ratings, or very expensive to get ratings off of these things that they actually put us online at CBC initially and there were no real plans to put us on television. And Shaw, which is a network cable provider out west, picked us up and put us on a digital channel. And, as you know, out west they are not as technologically developed as we are out here, so not a lot of them had digital boxes, so we were hearing stories where people were going out and purchasing digital boxes, so they could watch the Punjabi program. And then just with Facebook in itself, within a couple of day we had over 3000 members. And the key indications for CBC was it blew up online and a lot of people were watching this online, so when the season began Rogers picked it up, Bell picked it up, now we have our channels within these cable providers and I think that became a good indicator of how the fan following was becoming very receptive to it. And we recently celebrated Hockey Day In Canada, and we were allocated about 200 members, Maple Leaf Sports Entertainment approached us and said were doing an open practice between the Leafs and Canucks do you think the community would be interested and we jumped on board and said yes we think this would be a great idea. We really didn’t know what the outcome of that was going to be. So they initially gave us a number of 150 people or 100 people, can you put together 100 people and we said yes, sure, but we kept going back to them cause, you know, we said we need 50 more tickets, then 150, then 200, 250, then at on point we were requesting close to 300 tickets for people to attend. And in the end, we had over 260 kids, and parents, and staff, schools who came out to celebrate Hockey Day in Canada, these are all people from the Punjabi community. And that was a very good indicator, I guess, of the reception we are getting, from the community for this broadcast.”

03:17 - 03:22 - VAL, “Do you see the program expanding to other languages?

03:22 – 03:50 - HARNARAYAN, “I think, ya, CBC is trying different languages and I think its something definitely, in the States I mean, all us Canadians wonder what that SAP button is, it’s Spanish programming, so you can just switch from English to Spanish. It speaks to Canada’s diversity, it’s such a cultural Mosaic in this country, and it’s so diverse, it’s probably inevitable it’ll grow to other languages.

03:50 – 03:55 - VAL, “Do you see the program growing to other sports?”

03:56 – 05:56 - PARMINDER, “Ya, definitely, and I think it probably already has. The reason I say that is soccer. You can watch soccer in almost every different language. And, well, hockey, you can’t. And I think hockey, the NHL, has just kind of been behind the ball on this one. And even when the NBA, when Yao Ming came over, they started production in Cantonese and Mandarin. And we have so many players, especially in Toronto. Jose Calderon, Spanish. Or Italian, Bargnani, that other communities are looking at providing various languages. And I think with the Olympics around the corner, especially with Canada hosting them. Sometimes we wonder that having such a diverse country. And having people who are very skilled in various areas from all parts of the country, sorry all parts of the world, living in Canada, we should be the leaders of multiculturalism and just walking down the streets of Toronto, and other big metropolis’s, it’s very visible, the level of multicultural, I guess, integration amongst our regular common everyday lifestyle. I mean look at us, look at anyone else around you today and we can see the diverse community we live in. Why have we not taken this to our national sport. And, so when it comes to questions of you know, other sports coming on board, and I think that we, the NHL and hockey kind of missed the bus on it. Now it’s time for them to make a lot of ground on it. But where Canada can improve on this is when it comes to the Olympics, that by providing various languages the opportunity to watch what we feel are Canadian sports, you know, if it’s figure skating, or even curling, and so forth. A lot of other folks, or new immigrants, don’t appreciate these sports as much as we do cause of lack climate or anything that they weren’t raised by it. If we do want to continue striving making Hockey Canada’s national sport, and keeping it at that level, then we need to have these efforts in place in order to do so.

05:57 – 06:06 - VAL, “Obviously this program promotes multiculturalism, how do you feel it does this?”

06:06 – 07:10 - HARNARAYAN, “Sure, ya, I think, nothing says Canada is multicultural more than having, like Parminder said, having our national game broadcast in different languages. One thing Parminder and I also realize is this makes people feel more Canadian. You know, Parminder and I have talked about how we have received feedback from the community, where people who are new Canadaians , new immigrants to this country, they don’t really know what Hockey is all about and when they are at work a lot of their colleagues are talking about last nights game, or whatever, and this is something that has brought them up to speed about the rules of the game, they can follow it better, so you know, they feel more involved they feel more Canadian. Another thing we’ve also heard is that, it’s an opportunity for the second-generation immigrants, to learn the language, to keep a part of their heritage. So it’s almost bridging the cultures together, there’s Canadian culture that is hockey, and then you’re maintaining the Punjabi language. And you’re putting them both together, and that’s multiculturalism right there. And it’s great.”

07:10 – 08:18 – PARMINDER, “And when we speak about integration, I think one of the biggest issues here is some people, they commonly make the mistake, that by presenting other languages in a broadcast you are isolating people. And what a bigger isolation can you have if were not welcoming new people to our country? And I think that is a greater isolation than providing other language programming. When it comes to hockey, and I say this day in and day out, people stay up until 2 a.m. to watch cricket games because they are broadcast, but that’s a sport they can relate to cause they grew up with that sport. By presenting hockey in their own language they would be more inclined to watch it and to get to know it like we were mentioning earlier getting to know the rules. That’s what it comes down to, if you don’t know the rules of the game, I am very less likely to watch Rugby over football. I love football, I watch football, but I wouldn’t watch rugby. It’s presented in English; it’s just not my sports. But for a new immigrant, if we can present a sport in their language, they might feel something that is bringing them closer to us. And making Canadian Hockey, feel more like Punjabi hockey. And I think that’s the kind of key goal here.”

08:18 – 08:24 - VAL, “Did you both grow up watching or playing hockey?”

08:20 – 9:24 – different cut-aways of Val

08:24 – 08:52 - HARNARAYAN, “Most definitely, he is a die hard Leafs fan and I’m a die hard Oliers fan, although we can’t say that on the broadcast. But of course, growing up we were both hockey fans, we played a lot of bal hockey, and we played ice hockey at the shinny level, not really organized but ball hockey is actually something that is very popular in the Sikh community. And I think this is something that are going to make the newer kids, growing up, want to learn how to skate more, and probably, it won’t be long until we see Punjabi players in the NHL, who knows right?”

08:53 – 10:18- PARMINDER, “And I think the common culture, when winter comes, and the father figure of the family goes out in the backyard and makes this ice rink. And you know, kids learn to skate, and we have images of being in that family setting learning how to skate, then they are put into minor hockey, and they enjoy that sport, and its tradition. And I think that in a few years down the road, if we can, you know, kind of, inform the parents at that level about skating and hockey. And we grew up playing ball hockey. And whether it was snowing or not, we had our shovels in the back of our cars, or just having the shovels on the back of our bikes, and shoveling the ground to play hockey, that’s how diehard fans we are. And that kind of Canadian culture, is you know, second to none other. And how can we make people feel more Canadian, is I think just broadcast such as this so people can enjoy hockey at all levels and get involved in hockey and have their kids involved in hockey. So I think we have a hidden agenda here, we are trying to make hockey the best sport in the world…

10:20 – 10:30 - VAL, “…Do you speak in both languages during the commentary?”

10:30 – 11:06 – PARMINDER, “Well predominately we speak 90% Punjabi and then there is 10% of words in Elngish that don’t translate over. So it’s been well for us, that also growing up Canadian, also having learned the language of Punjabi , that we are able to integrate this. And a lot of kids like watching this because we do switch back and forth and then they can sit with their parents and A they are learning English, the parents are learning English from this. And for those who cant speak Punjabi, it makes it easier for them as well.”

11:06 – 11:28 - HARNARAYAN, “And just to add to that, field hockey is very popular in Punjab and that’s how a lot of the hockey terms and switch over like goal and net and shoot and score, there are some key words, offside is another, that’s what it’s called in field hockey in Punjab too. So there are some English words that are in both sports.”

11:29 - 11:32 - VAL, “Is there anything else you guys would like to add?”

11:32 – 12:11 - HARNARAYAN, “I think, just speaking for both of us, this is a dream come true. And it’s something we love to do. I think ourselves, and CBC, everybody, had no idea how big this was going to become. And having our broadcast all across Canada. And when we go into the grassroots communities, when we go to the community centers, Punjabi events that are happening and you see little kids come up and say hey you’re the guy and all that kind of stuff, it makes it feel like were giving back to the community and its been a fantastic experience and I hope it just keeps growing.

12:11 – 13:42 - PARMINDER, “And I think that for a Canadian society to the rich resourced of multiculturalism. You know we have always looked at multiculturalism and a negative thing. And at times it has taken place cause you look at ok there’s China town, or there’s Little Italy, or there’s Little India and so forth, and the integration process was sort of missing. And what we need are some common underlining’s, for people to have that common connection. And being in Canada and understanding the freedoms and the rights we have as a Canadian might not be available to them back home or the opportunities we have here. And how being almost second generation Canadians, we can look back and say hey, you know what, the common Canadian isn’t average white person, or average white male, or whatever it is. I am Canadian. And it’s my duty, as much as anyone elses, to stay patriotic to our natural fabric. That we can make Cnada the best it can be in a very inclusive manner. And the US likes to use the Melting Pot Scenario, where we all understand Globalization means using the best of what everyone can provide and bring to the table. So I think for anyone watching, for any Canadian watching, and listening, this is kind of key for what the future has in store. Its not about separation, its not about segregation, its about inclusivity and joining together to reach for the common goals and make this world a little bit more peaceful and friends for everyone to live in.

13:46 – 14:17 – OTS shot of Hockey Night in Canada starting from their booth

14:18 – 16:32 – OTS shot of calling the game, Val is in some shots as well acting interested

16:32 – 17:27 – 2 shot from ‘Val’s view’ (opposite angle of Tape 1)

Tape 3: Albion Theatre, Interview/B-Roll

00:00 – 00:02 – VAL, “How long has the Albion Theatre been playing forieng films?”

00:03 – 00:11 - JAMIL, “The Albion has been playing movies since 1994. We opened, and since then we have been playing foreign movies only.”

00:11 – 00:19 - VAL, “With an increase in Canada’s multiculturalism, have you seen an increase in business?”

00:19 – 00:27 - JAMIL, “Oh yes of course. The more people coming to Toronto from another country, the better it is for us. The better is it for the business.”

00:28 – 00:30 - VAL, “How many theatres do you have?”

00:30 – 00:32 - JAMIL, “We have 2 theatres.”

00:32 – 00:34 - VAL, “And how many seats?”

00:34 – 00:38 - JAMIL, “It seats over, just over 1600.”

00:43 – 00:44 - VAL, “And how much does it cost?”

00:44 – 00:49 - JAMIL, “It’s $8.50 for adults, $6.50 for seniors and $6.00 for kids.”

00:50 – 00:52 - VAL, “Tell us about your audience.”

00:52 – 01:05 - JAMIL, “The audience is mostly strictly east Indians. We do get some youths and senior people coming in, depending on the type of movie we’re playing. It all depends on the type of movies.”

01:06 – 01:09 – VAL, “Tell us about your other theatres.”

01:09 – 01:15 - JAMIL, “Other theatres, we have on in Woodside, which also plays Indian movies. Then we have one in Barrie, and they play Hollywood movies.”

02:30 – 3:21 – interview cut-aways

03:22 – 03:27 – bollywood movie poster

03:27 – 03:40 – Val sees the projector room

03:40 - -3:50 – various movie posters

03:50 - -3:55 – pan of concession stand

03:56 – 04:04 – ‘Coming Soon” sign

04:04 – 04:10 – Albion Theatre sign

04:32 – 04:37 – Doors to Theatre 1

04:38 – 04:43 – wide shot from back of theatre

04:50 – 05:20 – theatre b-roll

05:22 – 05:53 – Val buys a ticket, walks to concession stand

06:16 – 06:40 – Val buys snacks, “Where else can you get popcorn and Somosas, This is where Canadian culture meets Bollywood. Let’s check it out.”

06:45 – 07:30 – Val walks into theatre, sits down with snacks

07:30 – 07:45 – close up of Somosa deal

07:45 – 08:15 – Val walks and gets seat, TAKE 2, this one is better

10:30 – 10:52 - Val finishing her snacks, “MMM, that was great, just finished my snack. You just saw how Indian culture is being showcased to Canadians. Now let see how Canada’s favorite pass time is being infisued into Indian culture.”

Tape 4: Albion Theatre, Second Interview Camera/B-Roll

00:00 – 04:02 – Useful interview cut-aways, different interview shots

04:09 – 04:20 – tracking shot up aisle

04:21 – 04:28 – walk to theatre 1

04:45 – 04:53 – walk into open theatre doors

04:53 – 05:06 – pan of theatre foyer to reveal concession stand

05:07 – 06:17 – various theatre b-roll

06:17 – 06:36 – Val buys ticket (different angle from before)

07:19 – 07:25 – different angle to Val’s ‘Somosa stand up’

07:26 – 08:52 – different angles of Val taking her seat

Tape 5: Multicultural B-Roll

00:00 – 00:44 – TTC train car loads up, leaves

00:44 –01:00 – groups of Asian kids walking

01:01 – 01:40 – busy Toronto street corner

01:46 – 02:13 - RBC w/ Chinese lettering

02:14 – 02:39 – c/u Chinese lettering on store sign, reveal of busy corner to c/u of East Indian lady on cell phone

03:26 – 03:40 - people tracking past still camera

04:43 – 05:21 - Muslin Association of Canada, reveal to groups of people outside

06:10 – 06:36 – Canadian flag blowing in wind

08:20 – 08:55 – Toronto Chinese Catholic Centre

15:30 – 17:00 – sidewalks and shops of China-town, lots of people

17:55 – 18:10 – Chinese street vendor

Multicultural Trends Segment Outline

SEGMENT
Val’s Multicultural Saturday…

The segment will start with b-roll of ‘multiculturalism’ happening all around us. People walking the street, waiting for buses, going to the mall, getting groceries, etc. VO will set up the piece with approved stats (to ensure there are no repeats) about where different cultures like to locate and why.

Then, the segment will take you through the doors of the Albion Movie Theatre into a little ‘old time style’ reel with history about the foreign film theatre. While at the Albion, Jamil (Albion Manager) will provide interview clips. His clips will talk about the cinema, the content and most importantly the audience. He can comment on the trends of the theatre involving increased audience with a more multicultural population.

Once the movie is over, it’s time to check out Hockey Night in Canada. But how is that multicultural you ask? It’s in Punjabi!! Parminder and Harnarayan Singh are two Sikh men who commentate back-to-back games every Saturday for CBC’s Hockey Night in Canada. Both are heavily active in the community and perfect to interview for the segment. Through game footage, actual commentary in both English and Punjabi (for an interesting contrast) and interview clips with the Singh’s, we will hear about their experiences preaching the benefits of multiculturalism and how their trend, of hockey broadcast in Punjabi, has been rapidly growing.

To close the segment, Val will perform a stand-up ‘after the hockey game’. She learned a lot about the growing trends in our multicultural society and is ready to throw back to the studio. …

**I will write suggested intro’s/extro’s when I get a better idea of the exact footage and a paper edit. I will then send them to Producer’s/Hosts.

Interview: CBC Hockey Night in Canada Punjabi Edition

Parminder Singh
– Announcer: CBC Hockey Night in Canada Punjabi Edition
– Former President of the U of T Student Association
– Current President of Canadian Organization of Sikh Student
– Host for OMNI Television show Charhdi Kala
– Active in fundraising, mentoring youth and a leading advocate for increased youth leadership in the Sikh community

Harnarayan Singh
- Announcer: CBC Hockey Night in Canada Pujabi Edition
- General Secretary of Gurdwara Ram Das Darbar, a mission group to preserve Sikh heritage within Canadian society
- Talented music producer and is also a mortgage broker

Questions
- How/why/when did Hockey Night in Canada Punjabi Edition start?
- The above is not all one question…
- How has the program grown since the first game?
- Do you see the program expanding to even more languages?
- CBC often cover’s Toronto Raptors games Sunday afternoons and weekend Blue Jays series in the summer, do you see the program ever expanding to other sports?
- How do you find this program helps to promote multiculturalism?
- Were you both hockey fans growing up?
- Do you use both languages in your commentary?

Interview: Albion Cinemas Foreign Theatre

Jamil
- Albion Theatre Manager

Questions
- Tell us a bit about the history of the Albion Theatre?
- What kind of movie does the Albion screen?
- What are the rates, and do they differ for each kind of movie?
- How long has the Albion been screening foreign films?
- Have you seen an increase in business with an increase in Canada’s diversity?
- How many different theatres do you have? What is the capacity of the theatres?
- Tell us about your audience. The age, gender, cultures…
- Tell us how the audience has changed over the past decade

B-Roll
- “Multiculturalism” happening all around us
- Various shots inside/outside the Albion Cinemas, a ‘tour’ of the cinema
- People going in/out of movies, getting snacks, buying tickets, etc
- Posters of the different movies playing (can we show the posters without promoting the movie??)
- Commentators prepping for the game
- Commentators calling the game, interacting, etc
- Actual game footage (provided and cleared by CBC) of both English and Punjabi commentary

Music
- ‘old time’ movie style music, rag-time piano style like the black/white films
- upbeat ‘hip-hop-Punjabi’ music (listen to Punjabi MC ft. Jay-Z for inspiration)
- a sort of Bollywood style music (CityTV Sunday’s at 9 a.m. is a great example)
- slower, mystic sounding ancient Chinese-ish music, with flute-like instruments
**I hope the music descriptions are helpful…

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